What’s Worship Like?

Welcome Table Christian Church is progressive and, paradoxically, is passionate, deep and laid-back, easy-going at the same time. We are a small-but-mighty group of people of varied ethnicities, sexual orientations, genders, ages, and beliefs. People will be friendly and interested in you, but not pushy. You’ll find a refreshing honesty, no stuffy formality, and a sense of spiritual aliveness that’s hard to pin down. We are united by a commitment to love, to inclusion rather than exclusion, to radical acceptance of people whoever they may be and wherever they may be on their faith journey, and a knowing that Jesus’ way is not only relevant but vital as we navigate the world we live in today.

When you come to join us for Sunday morning worship, you will see chairs laid out, perhaps in concentric circles, perhaps in rows, perhaps around the labyrinth, with the Communion Table as the central focus. There are also some tables with chairs around them in the back with materials for creative reflection. There are slips of paper on which to write prayers to roll up and place into a crevice in our “Wailing Wall.” Sometimes we’re invited to choose a table, and sometimes people just will go because they feel the need to.

At the beginning of the service, children ages 4-10 are invited to go to Worship and Wonder, although parents can keep children with them if that works better for parent and child. Members of the community play an active role in our service, which lasts about 75 minutes. There will be some responsive readings, some hymns, usually accompanied by piano and/or guitar, a sermon, a reflection by an elder, and communion, which you are warmly invited to share in, regardless of who you are. Our communion uses grape juice rather than wine and gluten-free, vegan bread.

After the service, there is coffee and usually a nice array of goodies brought by community members, and a chance to socialize. People will be friendly and interested in you, but not pushy. You’ll find a refreshing honesty, no stuffy formality, and a sense of spiritual aliveness that’s hard to pin down.